Satsumaage, 6 Different Types of Japanese Fish Cakes

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Satsumaage, 6 Different Types of Japanese Fish Cakes

Satsumaage is a Japanese deep-fried fish cake. It’s common to buy them from market in Japan, but we can make it by ourselves, and it’s delicious.
Prep Time 0 mins
Cook Time 1 hr
Servings 2 people
INGREDIENTS
  • white fish (like pikeperch or common whitefish, fresh, see note below) 350 g
  • egg 1
  • soy sauce 1 tablespoon
  • potato starch 1 tablespoon
  • brown sugar 1 teaspoon
ingredient
  • check the recipe below
tool
  • food processor
  • frying oil
  • frying tong
  • fryer or pot for deep fry
  • kitchen paper
  • tablespoon 2
INSTRUCTIONS
  • Put the white fish that is cut to small pieces in a food processor with seasonings and let it run until you have a nice paste type structure.
Simple satsumaage
  • No ingredients added to the paste, form into balls and deep fry.
Hijiki Satsumaage
  • Soak 2 tablespoons of dried hijiki in hot water for about 10 min and drain. Chop 50g carrot and 50g spring onion roughly to small bits. Mix 200g of ground fish with the ingredients.
Onion Satsumaage
  • Chop 50g of onion roughly to slices. Mix well with 100g of fish paste.
Spring Onion Satsumaage
  • Chop 50g of spring onions roughly to semi small pieces. Mix well with 100g of fish paste.
Corn Satsumaage
  • Drain 50g of canned corn. Mix well with 100g of fish paste.
Recommended, its totally oishi! Mushroom Satsumaage
  • Remove the shaft from a small or medium sized fresh champignon mushrooms. Fill with fish paste.
Deep-frying the satsumaage
  • Warm the oil to 170 degrees Celsius.
  • Take a spoonful of satsumaage paste and smooth out the surface with another spoon. Drop directly into the warm oil.
  • Fry until the surface is golden brown. Be careful not to overfry them, as they will be dry.
  • Drain off the excess oil on kitchen paper.
  • It’s ready to be served! Good for preserving in the freezer for future needs.
NOTES
Sometimes I make a batch of ganmokoro, satsumaage and fried tofu to preserve in the freezer. It’s convenient to have good foods ready.
I have made Satsuma-age several times and experimented with it. The first time making them in Finland, I used white fish I bought from the fish counter the same day and it turned out be very juicy. The second time, I remember buying the white fish sold in vacuum packs and using it just before the expiration date, and I was disappointed to find that it was quite dry. It's important to use fresh fish.
Fresh fish sold in the Finnish fish markets are mainly salmon and different white fishes. Commonly sold white fishes are species like siika and kuha as fillets, small fish fillets silakka, and whole small fish called muikku.
I have tried several types of white fish when making satsumaage, and they all turned out delicious. I think freshness is more important than the type of fish.
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