Nikujaga, Japanese Simmered Pork and Potato

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Nikujaga, Japanese Simmered Pork and Potato

Nikujaga, Japanese Simmered Pork and Potato is one of the most popular home cooking. This recipe is the easiest and quickest nikujaga.
Prep Time 0 mins
Cook Time 20 mins
Rest After Cook 30 mins
Servings 4 people
INGREDIENTS
  • pork (thin slice) 150 g
  • potato 400 g
  • onion 300 g
  • carrot 200 g
  • soy sauce 4 tblespoon
  • brown sugar 4 tablespoon
  • dashi powder (no need when you use dashi soup) 1.5 teaspoon
  • water (or 400 mL dashi soup) 400 mL
INSTRUCTIONS
  • Cut the potatoes and carrots into bite size pieces.
  • Put it in a heatproof container, cover it with plastic wrap, and heat it in the microwave until the vegetables become soft.
  • Cut the onions into wedges.
  • Slice the pork into bite-sized slices.
  • Put all the ingredients in a pot and heat it over medium heat for about 10 minutes and it's ready! The next day taste will be even better as the flavors get stronger.
NOTES
The microwave oven is essential for the preparation of root vegetables. Potatoes, in particular, can be precooked in the microwave for curry, stew, and other dishes, since there is no risk of them falling apart. I also make mashed potatoes in the microwave because boiling them can take too much time when I feel hungry.
Basically, if you want your vegetables to be soft enough for eating and to hold their shape, microwaving is the best way to go. The process of letting the flavors soak in is separate from the process of softening, so it doesn't matter if you heat them in the microwave first. The water-soluble nutrients do not flow out, so there is a nutritional advantage to microwaving.
On the other hand, if you want to make the fibers more tender, you need to boil or fry them. For example, if you want to make a potage soup, heating it in the microwave alone will not soften veggies enough. You need to boil the vegetables in a pot until they start to break down. Of course, if you put water and vegetables in a heat-resistant container and heat it in the microwave, you can achieve the same effect as simmering, but considering the worry of spillage and the subsequent cooking time, I have decided that when I need that effect I just boil veggies on the stove in a pot.
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