One Hour Anko using Pressure Cooker, Easy and Quick

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It usually takes about three hours to make Anko, but if you use a pressure cooker, you can make Anko in one hour even with dried azuki beans.

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Anko in Pressure Cooker

It was New Year’s Day and I forgot to make Anko. I thought I could save time by using a pressure cooker, and to my surprise, it took only an hour to make Anko. I wondered what the difference was between this and the regular Anko, and how I should use it differently.

Texture is Different

When cooking Anko using a regular recipe, the azuki beans are boiled slowly in hot water and allowed to absorb water slowly.[ https://pieceofoishi.com/recipe/dessert/anko/ ]

This makes it possible to produce anko with the grains remaining nicely. Of course, you have to mash them to some extent in the final process, but you can still feel the grains of the azuki beans.

If you use a pressure cooker, the cooking time will be shorter, but most of the azuki beans will be crushed. If you want to enjoy the grains of azuki, it may not be enough.

However, it is very useful for making oshiruko and zenzai. If you want to use Anko, you have to make Anko once, then dissolve it in hot water…it is quite time-consuming. However, if you use a pressure cooker, all you have to do is add sugar to the pressurized azuki beans.

Various Anko Recipes

Since moving to Finland, I have been researching different ways to make Anko. I’ve compiled a list of various recipes, from the regular recipe to the one using a pressure cooker, to white anko and uguisu-anko using water-boiled beans.
Recipe for Anko: Easy to Make Anko with Many Ways
I've compiled a list of various recipes, from the regular recipe to the one using a pressure cooker, white bean paste and Uguisu-anko using beans boiled in water.

Recipe

One Hour Anko using Pressure Cooker, Easy and Quick

It usually takes about three hours to make Anko, but if you use a pressure cooker, you can make Anko in one hour even with dried azuki beans.
Prep Time0 mins
Cook Time1 hr
KeywordDessert
Servings400 g beans
INGREDIENTS
  • azuki beans 400 g
  • brown sugar 300 g
  • salt 1 pinch
  • water (See recipe)
EQUIPMENT
Pressure pot
Colander
Silicone spatula
INSTRUCTIONS
  • If you replace some of the brown sugar with raw brown sugar, you will get a fragrant anko.
Cooking
  • In a pressure pot, bring azuki beans and twice the amount of water (800 mL) to a boil over high heat, uncovered.
  • Boil for 5 minutes, drain in a colander and discard the water.
  • In a pressure pot, add azuki beans and 4 times the amount of water (1600mL). If you want to reduce the amount of beans, pay attention to the amount of water (*1).
  • Put a metal colander attached to the pressure pot to prevent the exhaust vent from being clogged with azuki beans’ skin.
  • Cover the cooker with the lid and set it to low pressure (vegetable mode).
  • Heat over high heat, and when pressure builds, reduce heat to medium.
  • After pressurizing, cook for 30 minutes.
  • Open the pressure valve and open the lid.
  • Make sure that the azuki beans are sufficiently soft. If there are hard beans, add 200mL of water and pressurize for an additional 10 minutes.
  • Add sugar and let it dissolve. Can be used as is for Oshiruko or Zenzai.
  • To make anko, boil down to desired consistency. It will not burn, so leave it for a while, then stir, and repeat.
  • Add salt, mix well and serve.
Points
  • Since the pressurization time is long, be careful with the amount of water. Calculate as following:
  • Water absorbed by azuki = amount of azuki x 2.5 times
  • Water that evaporates when heated over medium heat = 200 mL/10 minutes x 30 minutes
  • If you are not used to using a pressure cooker, it is safe to add more water than this total. There is no problem if the water is too much because it will be boiled down later. Keep an eye out for the sound of steam while pressurizing, and be careful not to let it burn out.
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