How to Cook Anko, Japanese Sweet Bean Paste

ad
Japanese people love the combination of anko and pie crust. When I made Finnish Joulutorttu with anko, it was a hit with the Finns as well.
Joulutorttu, Finnish Traditional Christmas Pastry
Christmas tarts filled with plum jam are a traditional dessert found in every Nordic country. In Finland, it is called Joulutoruttu.

The commercial ones are good, but they are often too sweet, so I make my own. You can freeze and preserve it.

How to Cook Anko, Japanese Sweet Bean Paste

Anko, sweet beans paste, made by slow-boiling azuki beans, is indispensable for Japanese sweets. It goes well with both bread and pie.
Prep Time0 mins
Cook Time4 hrs
Servings900 g of anko
INGREDIENTS
  • azuki beans 300 g
  • brown sugar 300 g
  • salt 1 pinch
  • water
  • large pot
  • sieve
  • spatula
INSTRUCTIONS
  • Put the azuki beans and 1,200 mL of water in a large pot and heat on high setting for 30 minutes. The azuki beans will absorb water and become larger, but they still remain hard.
  • Pour out the hot water.
  • Put the azuki beans and 1,200 mL of water in a pot and heat with high heat.
  • When the skin of the adzuki beans starts to crack, reduce the heat to low.
  • Boil slowly until all the azuki beans skin are torn. Boil the beans long enough, or they will remain hard when you make them into anko. Boil them patiently. Do not mix that much, because the azuki beans will be crushed. When the water is reduced, add boiling water to replace it.
  • Take out some adzuki beans to test they can all be easily mashed with your fingers.
  • Put the pot in the sink. Pour a thin continuous stream of cold water into the pot, letting water run out of the pot slowly.
  • When the water in the pot is clear and the azuki has cooled down, put the azuki in a sieve and drain out the water.
  • Put the azuki beans and brown sugar in a pot and shake the pot so that the sugar is spread throughout.
  • Put the pot on medium heat.
  • When the water coming out of the azuki beans is reduced, add salt and heat, stirring with a spatula. Stop heating it when there is still some fluid left. As it cools, anko will harden.
  • Chill it and it’s ready for eating or cooking. If it becomes too hard, you can add a little bit of hot water.
NOTES
Azuki beans are sold as red beans in Asian markets. You can check the detail in this article.
Japanese Beans and Beans in Finland
Japanese eat beans a lot like anko. Here is a list of the Japanese beans names and how to read them, and their names in English and Finnish.
 
Japanese people love the combination of anko and pie crust. When I made Finnish Joulutorttu with anko, it was a hit with the Finns as well.
Joulutorttu, Finnish Traditional Christmas Pastry
Christmas tarts filled with plum jam are a traditional dessert found in every Nordic country. In Finland, it is called Joulutoruttu.
 
The commercial ones are good, but they are often too sweet, so I make my own. You can freeze and preserve it.
 
If you feel too much about this recipe, you can cook anko with boiled beans.
White, Green and Matcha Anko with Canned Navy Beans and Peas
The easiest recipe for anko using canned beans. You can use navy beans for white and matcha anko, and green peas for green anko, uguisu an.
share your dish!

comment

Copied title and URL