The Easiest and Simplest Japanese Bread Dough

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The Easiest and Simplest Japanese Bread Dough

The easiest and simplest Japanese bread dough recipe. Easy to handle and bakes up fluffy, perfect for sweet buns and souzai pan.
Prep Time 0 mins
Cook Time 15 mins
Rest After Cook 1 hr
Keyword Bread
Servings 300 g of flour
INGREDIENTS
EQUIPMENT
  • electric scale
  • stand mixer or home bakery
INSTRUCTIONS
Primary fermentation
  • If using fresh yeast, warm the milk to body temperature and mix it with the yeast (*3, *4).
  • Put all the ingredients into a bowl and knead immediately with a stand mixer or a home bakery (*5).
  • Stop kneading when the dough stays together(*6) and the surface becomes smooth.
  • Roll the dough into a ball and cover lightly with a wet cloth or plastic wrap.
  • Allow the first fermentation to take place at room temperature or in the oven’s fermentation function. 30 minutes to 1 hour, when the dough has doubled in size, the first fermentation is complete.
Refer to the recipe for each bread after this step.
NOTES
*1 Up to 1/6 of the total flour can be substituted with whole wheat or light wheat flour. Please check and test recipe to see how much bread can be baked with 300g of flour.
Flour in Finland
Many different types of flour are sold in the markets. Which flour should I use? Which is the strongest flour? What about light flour?
*2 In Finland, you can find fresh yeast in even the smallest of markets, and I prefer to use fresh yeast because it is inexpensive (about 30 yen for 50g) and has a good flavor when baked.
*3 Heat 200g of milk in the microwave for about a minute in a lower setting to get it nice and warm. Add the fresh yeast, tearing it into pieces, and mix gently with a spoon. The yeast may sink to the bottom and clump up, so scrape it out when you combine it with the other ingredients.
*4 Never add any ingredients other than milk. Some recipes call for activating the milk and sugar with yeast, but this is a different kind of yeast, not the familiar instant dry yeast or fresh yeast. For fresh yeast, it is enough to warm it up, and adding sugar or salt will kill the yeast bacteria.
*5 Japanese recipes often specify where and when to put the sugar, salt and yeast, but I believe it doesn’t make any difference as long as you combine the ingredients and start mixing right away. As for not putting the yeast and salt together, as mentioned above, even sugar has the ability to kill yeast. It’s just that you don’t want them to be with each other for too long, because the time it takes for the yeast to die is much shorter with salt than with sugar. If you use fresh yeast, it is dissolved in milk, so as soon as you add the ingredients, no matter how hard you try, it will mix with the salt as soon as you start mixing. Anyway, the important thing is to mix the ingredients as soon as they are combined.
*6 *6 If the dough sticks to the walls or bottom of the container and does not come together easily, or if the dough is so loose that it drips right off the hook when you open the stand mixer, add flour, 1 tablespoon at a time, and mix it in. If the dough sticks to the bottom of the container a little, but doesn’t drip off the hook, it’s okay.
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